IMG_3075Reclaiming Iraq: The 1920 Revolution and the Founding of the Modern State, University of Texas Press (2013):

While some scholars would argue that there was no “Iraq” before King Faysal’s coronation in 1921, Iraqi history spans fourteen centuries of tribal communities that endured continual occupation in their historic homeland, including Mongol invasions in the thirteenth century and subsequent Ottoman and British invasions. An Iraqi identity was established long before the League of Nations defined the nation-state of Iraq in 1932. Drawing on neglected primary sources and other crucial accounts, including memoirs and correspondence, Reclaiming Iraq puts the 1920 revolt against British occupation in a new light—one that emphasizes the role of rural fighters between June and November of that year.
While most accounts of the revolution have been shaped by the British administration and successive Iraqi governments, Abbas Kadhim sets out to explore the reality that the intelligentsia of Baghdad and other cities in the region played an ideological role but did not join in the fighting. His history depicts a situation we see even today in conflicts in the Middle East, where most military engagement is undertaken by rural tribes that have no central base of power. In the study of the modern Iraqi state, Kadhim argues, Faysal’s coronation has detracted from the more significant, earlier achievements of local attempts at self-rule. With clarity and insight, this work offers an alternative perspective on the dawn of modern Iraq.

Hawza bookThe Hawza Under Siege: A Study in the Ba’th Party Archive, Boston University (2013):

This groundbreaking and richly nuanced study draws on the archives of the Ba’thist regime in Iraq and examines the efforts of Saddam Hussein and his subordinates to influence, control, intimidate and subvert Shi’i religious authorities, especially the leading clerical authorities.
The Occasional Papers feature inter-disciplinary scholarship focusing on Iraq by leading and emerging scholars. All papers are refereed.
Series Editor: Professor Augustus Richard Norton
The Institute for Iraqi Studies at Boston University serves as a catalyst for research on contemporary Iraq. The Institute was founded in 2010 and periodically sponsors workshops, visiting fellowships, lectures, film series and conferences, in addition to the Occasional Papers.

Governance in the Middle East and North Africa, Routledge (213):

This is an essential reading for scholars, activists and policy makers. This new Handbook presents the first comprehensive framework of the question of governance in the Middle East in its various forms and manifestations: political, economic, and government performance.

gov in MENA This book is structured into two parts: Part I provides some theoretical background and analyzes the patterns and challenges of governance in the Middle East, providing some global context; Part II will examine specific cases in selected countries and regions in the Middle East and North Africa.  This book is aimed at a wide audience. Policy makers, policy analysts, as well as journalists will benefit from the history and analysis presented in the book. Also, academics will find important material for research and class work. Professors teaching courses on US Foreign policy, Middle East, International Relations, Comparative Politics and many related fields will find the book a very suitable choice for their students to read. Given the media and general public’s interest in the Middle East and North Africa, it will also appeal to a wide range of educated readers in the USA, the United Kingdom and many other countries world-wide.